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Interesting Fact - Small Talk

According to a documentary by Channel 4,  when they go to the pub together men are more likely to talk about their children and relationship issues, than football and women.

(I would imagine the topics might change if they know there's someone filming them.)

On This Day

29th May

1660 – Charles II was restored to the throne of Great Britain. (It was his birthday too.)

1913 – Igor Stravinsky's ballet score; The Rite of Spring premiered in Paris, France, provoking a riot.

1914 – Ocean liner RMS Empress of Ireland sank in the Gulf of St. Lawrence; 1,024 people died.

1919 – Einstein's theory of general relativity was tested (and later confirmed) by Arthur Eddington's observation of a total solar eclipse in Principe and by Andrew Crommelin in Sobral, Ceará, Brazil.

1942 – Bing Crosby, the Ken Darby Singers and the John Scott Trotter Orchestra recorded Irving Berlin's "White Christmas", the best-selling Christmas single in history.

1953 – Sir Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay became the first people to reach the summit of Mount Everest, on Tenzing Norgay's (adopted) 39th birthday.

1968 - Manchester Utd Football Club won the European Cup becoming the first English club to do so.

1972 – 26 people were killed and dozens mo…

On This Day

28th May

1503 – James IV of Scotland and Margaret Tudor were married according to a Papal Bull by Pope Alexander VI. A Treaty of Everlasting Peace between Scotland and England signed on that occasion resulted in a peace that lasted ten years.

1533 – The Archbishop of Canterbury Thomas Cranmer declares the marriage of King Henry VIII of England to Anne Boleyn valid.

1859 – Big Ben was drawn on a carriage pulled by 16 horses from Whitechapel Bell Foundry to the Palace of Westminster.

1934 – The Glyndebourne festival in England was inaugurated.

1937 – Neville Chamberlain became British Prime Minister.

1942 – In retaliation for the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich, Nazis in Czechoslovakia killed over 1800 people.

1952 – Women in Greece were given the right to vote.

1959: Two monkeys, Abe and Baker, became the first living creatures to survive a space mission. (Able died from the effects of anesthesia given for removal of implanted electrodes.)

1964 – The Palestine Liberation Organizati…

On This Day

23rd May

1701 - Capt. William Kidd was hanged in London for piracy and murder.

1977 - More than 100 children and six teachers were taken hostage in a primary school in Northern Holland (The Netherlands).

1984 - At least four people were killed and dozens more injured in an explosion at a Lancashire water treatment plant.

On This Day

20th May

1506 - Christopher Columbus died in poverty in Spain.

1570 – Cartographer Abraham Ortelius issued the first modern atlas.

1609 – Shakespeare's Sonnets were first published in London, perhaps illicitly, by the publisher Thomas Thorpe.

1631 – The city of Magdeburg in Germany was seized by forces of the Holy Roman Empire and most of its inhabitants massacred, in one of the bloodiest incidents of the Thirty Years' War.

1873 – Levi Strauss and Jacob Davis received a U.S. patent for blue jeans with copper rivets.

1902 – Cuba gained independence from the United States. Tomás Estrada Palma became the first President of Cuba.

1927 - Charles Lindbergh took off for Paris from Roosevelt Field in Long Island, N.Y., aboard the Spirit of St. Louis on the first nonstop solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean.

1932 – Amelia Earhart took off from Newfoundland to begin the world's first solo nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean by a female pilot. She landed in Ireland the next da…

Interesting Fact - Packaging

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According to the Recycling Association, Lucozade sport drink bottles, and Pringles crisp tubes are the worst products for recycling.

(It's not just about how much plastic is used; the variety of materials that go into the packaging is key.  Pringles with its distinctive tube is one of the worst: it has a metal base, plastic cap, foil tear off lide and foil-lined cardboard sleeve.  The association described it as a nightmare.

I'm not sure which bin they should go into, but luckily I don't drink Lucozade, and I don't eat Pringles.)


On This Day

19th May

1499 – Catherine of Aragon, was married by proxy to Arthur Tudor, Prince of Wales. Catherine was just 13 and Arthur 12.

1536 – Anne Boleyn, the second wife of Henry VIII of England, was beheaded for adultery, treason, and incest.

1568 – Queen Elizabeth I of England ordered the arrest of Mary Queen of Scots.

1649 – An Act of Parliament declaring England a Commonwealth was passed by the Long Parliament. England would be a republic for the next eleven years.

1890 – Ho Chi Minh, the1st President of Vietnam was born.

1897 – Oscar Wilde was released from Reading Prison.

1943 – British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt set Monday, May 1, 1944 as the date for the cross-English Channel landing (D-Day). It would be delayed over a month due to bad weather.

1962 - Marilyn Monroe sang "that" birthday salute to U.S. President John F. Kennedy at Madison Square Garden, New York City.

1984 – Poet John Betjeman, who had been Britain's Poet…

Interesting Word - Museum

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The word ‘museum’ comes from classical Latin where it meant a place holy to the Muses.


(In Greek mythology the Muses were the goddesses of inspiration in literature, science and the arts.

The 9 muses were each protectors of a different art and symbolised by a different item; Calliope (epic poetry - a writing tablet), Clio (history - a scroll or book), Euterpe (lyric poetry - an aulos (a Greek flute)), Thalia (comedy and pastoral poetry - a comic mask), Melpomene (tragedy - a sword), Terpsichore (dance - a lyre), Erato (love poetry - a cithara (a Greek type of lyre)), Polyhymnia (sacred poetry / hymns - a veil), and Urania (astronomy - a globe and compass).

Nowadays, the word "muse" can  be used to refer to any person who inspires an artist, writer, or musician.)

More Interesting Stuff